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Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting
Pacific Fine Art

Emily Carr Original Vintage Canadian Group of Seven Hillside in France Expressionist Landscape Oil on Canvas Post Cubist Modernist Post Impressionism Painting

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Emily Carr, (1871-1945), original vintage Canadian Group of Seven French hillside landscape post-impressionist modernist oil painting on canvas. The painting measures approximately 28" X 40". The canvas has very small pinholes of degradation of the canvas that are very small, scattered, and viewable when the painting is held against the light. All paint is in very condition with no issues or flaws. The painting is in its original condition and has not been restored. All paint present is original to the painting. 

Emily Carr, also known as M. Emily Carr in some instances, was a Canadian artist and writer who drew inspiration from the Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast. She was among the Canadian painters who embraced Modernist and Post-Impressionist styles. Initially, Carr's work, particularly "The Indian Church," did not gain widespread recognition until she shifted her focus from Aboriginal themes to landscapes, specifically forest scenes that conveyed a sense of ancient magnificence. Alongside her artistic pursuits, Carr was one of the earliest chroniclers of life in British Columbia and is regarded as a Canadian icon, according to The Canadian Encyclopedia. 

Early Life: Emily Carr was born on December 13, 1871, in Victoria, British Columbia. She was the second-youngest of nine children born to Richard and Emily Carr, both of English descent. The Carr family lived on Birdcage Walk (now Government Street) in Victoria's James Bay district, near the legislative buildings and the town itself. Carr's upbringing was steeped in English traditions, as her father believed it was sensible to maintain British customs and citizenship while living on Vancouver Island, a British colony. The family home was designed in lavish English fashion, featuring high ceilings, ornate moldings, and a parlor. Carr received a Presbyterian upbringing, which included Sunday morning prayers and evening Bible readings. Her father would assign one child each week to recite the sermon, but Carr consistently struggled with this task. Following the death of her mother in 1886 and her father in 1888, Carr's oldest sister, Edith Carr, became the guardian of the remaining children.

Artistic Pursuits: Carr's father encouraged her artistic inclinations, but it was only after her parents' passing, in 1890, that she began to seriously pursue art. She studied at the San Francisco Art Institute from 1890 to 1892 before returning to Victoria. In 1899, Carr traveled to London and attended the Westminster School of Art. During her time in London, she also visited the Nootka Indian mission in Ucluelet on Vancouver Island's west coast. In 1905, Carr returned to British Columbia after spending time at a rural art colony in St Ives, Cornwall. She briefly held a teaching position at the "Ladies Art Club" in Vancouver but faced backlash from her students due to her rude behavior, which included smoking and cursing at them. As a result, her teaching position was short-lived, lasting no more than a month.

Early Works on Indigenous People: At the age of 27 in 1898, Carr made her first sketching and painting trips to Aboriginal villages. She stayed in a village near Ucluelet, home to the Nuu-chah-nulth people. Her time there left a lasting impression on her. Carr's interest in Indigenous life was further deepened by a trip to Alaska in 1907 with her sister Alice. In 1912, Carr embarked on a sketching trip to First Nations villages in Haida Gwaii, the Upper Skeena River, and Alert Bay. Although Carr eventually left the Pacific Northwest villages, their impact remained with her. She even adopted the Indigenous name "Klee Wyck" and used it as the title for one of her written works. In 1913, Carr held a significant exhibition showcasing her works depicting First Nations villages and totem poles in their original settings. She delivered a lecture on totems during this exhibition, emphasizing her firsthand study of each pole's unique characteristics.

Work in France: Seeking to expand her knowledge of evolving artistic trends, Carr traveled to Paris in 1910 to study at the Académie Colarossi. During her time in Montparnasse, she

Carr's painting can be divided into different periods, each characterized by distinct influences and themes. In her early years, she drew inspiration from the Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast. Initially, her work focused on Aboriginal themes, but it wasn't until she shifted her attention to landscapes, particularly forest scenes, that she gained wider recognition for her art. These landscapes evoked a sense of primeval grandeur and showcased Carr's adoption of a Modernist and Post-Impressionist style.

Born on December 13, 1871, in Victoria, British Columbia, Emily Carr was the second-youngest of nine children. Her parents, Richard, and Emily Carr, were of English descent, and they instilled in their children a strong English upbringing. Emily's father, in particular, encouraged her artistic inclinations. After her parents' deaths in the late 1880s, Carr pursued her art more seriously, studying at the San Francisco Art Institute and later at the Westminster School of Art in London.

Throughout her life, Carr had a deep appreciation for Indigenous cultures. She made numerous sketching and painting trips to Aboriginal villages, starting with her stay near Ucluelet on the west coast of Vancouver Island in 1898. Her experiences during these trips left a lasting impression on her, and she became deeply interested in Indigenous life. Carr even adopted the Indigenous name Klee Wyck and used it as the title of one of her written works.

In 1912, Carr held a significant exhibition of her artwork depicting First Nations villages and totem poles in their original settings. Her passion for documenting and portraying the Aboriginal culture was evident in her detailed lectures and writings on the subject. Despite facing challenges and criticism, Carr remained committed to showcasing the significance of Indigenous heritage through her art.

Determined to further her artistic knowledge and explore evolving trends, Carr traveled to Europe in 1910 to study at the Académie Colarossi in Paris. There, she met modernist painter Harry Gibb, whose use of vibrant colors and distortion intrigued her. Carr's study with Gibb shaped her style, leading her to adopt a more vibrant color palette and embrace Modernist approaches.

Carr's artistic journey was marked by encounters with influential figures and movements. In 1927, she met members of the Group of Seven, Canada's leading modern painters, during an exhibition on West Coast Aboriginal art at the National Gallery. Lawren Harris, a prominent member of the Group, welcomed Carr into their ranks, ending her artistic isolation and igniting a prolific period in her career. Harris's influence, coupled with Carr's exploration of Northern European symbolism and her interest in Theosophy, shaped her artistic direction.

During the late 1920s and 1930s, Carr's work gained recognition, and her paintings were exhibited in major cities around the world. She continued to travel, documenting landscapes and Indigenous cultures. Carr's art evolved, incorporating abstract and stylized elements while capturing the emotional and mythological essence embedded in totemic carvings.

In her later years, Carr faced health challenges, including heart attacks and a stroke, which limited her ability to paint. As a result, her focus shifted to writing, and she published her first book, "Klee Wyck," in 1941. The book earned her the Governor-General's Award for non-fiction and showcased her ability to articulate her experiences and observations.

Carr's paintings from her final decade reflected her growing concerns about the environmental impact of industrialization on British Columbia's landscape. She depicted the encroachment of deforestation and its effects on the lives of Indigenous communities, signaling her commitment to raising awareness about these issues through her art. 

 

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