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Dong Kingman Dong Moy Chu Kingman Original Vintage Chinese American California Regionalist WPA Nocturnal Seascape Oil Painting
Dong Kingman Dong Moy Chu Kingman Original Vintage Chinese American California Regionalist WPA Nocturnal Seascape Oil Painting
Dong Kingman Dong Moy Chu Kingman Original Vintage Chinese American California Regionalist WPA Nocturnal Seascape Oil Painting
Dong Kingman Dong Moy Chu Kingman Original Vintage Chinese American California Regionalist WPA Nocturnal Seascape Oil Painting
Dong Kingman Dong Moy Chu Kingman Original Vintage Chinese American California Regionalist WPA Nocturnal Seascape Oil Painting
Pacific Fine Art

Dong Kingman Dong Moy Chu Kingman Original Vintage Chinese American California Regionalist WPA Nocturnal Seascape Oil Painting

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Dong Kingman (Chinese: 曾景文, 1911 – 2000) was a Chinese American painter, and one of America's leading watercolor masters. As a painter at the forefront of the California Style School of Painting, he was known for his urban and landscape paintings, as well as his graphic design work in the Hollywood film industry. He has won widespread critical acclaim and his works are included in over 50 public and private collections worldwide, including Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Brooklyn Museum; deYoung Museum and Art Institute, Chicago. 

Dong Kingman was born Dong Moy Shu in Oakland, California, the son of Chinese immigrants from Hong Kong. At the age of five and a half, he traveled with his family back to Hong Kong, where his father established a dry goods business. He began his formal education at the Bok Jai School, where he was given a school name in accordance with Chinese customs. Hearing that he aspired to be an artist, his instructor gave him the name "King Man" (lit. "scenery" and "composition" in Cantonese). He would later combine the two names into Kingman, placing his family name first in accordance with Chinese naming conventions, creating the name Dong Kingman.

Kingman continued his education at the Chan Sun Wen School, where he excelled at calligraphy and watercolor painting. He studied under Szeto Wai, the Paris-trained head of the Lingnan Academy. It was under Szeto's instruction that Kingman was first exposed to Northern European trends. Kingman would later state that Szeto was his "first and only true influence."

Kingman returned to the United States in his late teens. In 1929, he attended the Fox Morgan Art School, while holding down a variety of jobs. It was at this time that he chose to concentrate on watercolor painting.

His critical breakthrough occurred in 1936, when he gained a solo exhibition at the San Francisco Art Association. This exhibition brought him national recognition and success.

In the late 1930s, Kingman served as an artist in the Works Progress Administration, painting over 300 works with the relief program. In 1942 and 1944, Kingman received the Guggenheim Fellowship. During World War II, he was drafted into the U.S. Army, but was transferred to work as a map artist in the Office of Strategic Services[1] at Camp Beal, California and Washington, D.C, by a fan of his work, Eleanor Roosevelt.

Kingman settled in Brooklyn, New York after the war, where he held a position as an art instructor at Columbia University and Hunter College from 1946, for the next ten years. In New York, he was associated with Midtown, Wildenstein, and Hammer galleries.

Kingman had married Janice Wong, in 1926. She died in 1954, and he married the writer Helena Kuo, in 1956. Kuo died in 1999.

During the 1950s, Kingman served as a United States cultural ambassador and international lecturer for the Department of State. In the 1950s and 1960s, Kingman worked as an illustrator in the film industry, designing the backgrounds for a number of major motion pictures including "55 Days at Peking", The Sand Pebbles and the Hollywood adaptation of "Flower Drum Song". Over 300 of his film-related works are permanently housed at the Fairbanks Center for Motion Picture Study, at the Margaret Herrick Library of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, in Beverly Hills, California.

In 1981, Kingman made history as the first American artist to be featured in a solo exhibition following the resumption of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and China; when the Ministry of Culture of the People's Republic of China hosted a critically acclaimed exhibition, that drew over 100,000 people.

The 1990s saw major exhibitions in Taiwan at the Taipei Modern Art Museum in 1995; and the Taichung Provincial Museum, in 1999.

Dong Kingman passed away from pancreatic cancer in his home in New York City in 2000, at age 89.


Dong Moy Chu Kingman
(1911-2000)
Oil on Canvas
Nocturnal Seascape
Signed lower right
Estimated to have been created approximately 1955
Painting measures approximately 12” X 24”, plus frame
In frame, painting measures approximately 19.25” X 31.25
Painting is in excellent original condition, with no previous
over paints, or chemical cleanings performed. Painting is still housed in original 1950’s era wood carved frame.

 

 

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