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Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist  Munich-American Realism Oil Painting
Pacific Fine Art

Frank Duveneck Original 19th Century Philadelphia School Antique Green Wooded Massachusetts Plein Air Landscape With a Mill Fine American Impressionist Munich-American Realism Oil Painting

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Frank Duveneck, (1848-1919), original antique Mill and Green Wooded Massachusetts landscape and American impressionism oil painting, circa 1890. An excellent example by an early American impressionist, the foliage is rendered in fine detail, and the green color of this painting is remarkable. The mood is quiet and peaceful The painting is an oil on Philadelphia Academy Board. The painting is in excellent condition and is housed in a late 19th-century antique carved wood frame, with a modern dark brown suede mat.  The painting measures approximately 13.5" X 15.5", plus the antique frame.

Frank Duveneck (born Frank Decker; October 9, 1848 – January 3, 1919) was an American painter known for his figure and portrait paintings. 

Early Life: Duveneck was born in Covington, Kentucky, to German immigrant Bernhard Decker. His father died when he was just one year old, and his mother remarried Joseph "Squire" Duveneck. At a young age, Frank began studying art under the guidance of a local painter named Johann Schmitt. He also apprenticed with a German firm specializing in church decoration. Although he grew up in Covington, Duveneck was considered an outsider within the artistic community of Cincinnati due to his Catholic beliefs and German heritage. 

Career: In 1869, Duveneck traveled to Munich, Germany, to study at the Royal Academy of Munich with artists Wilhelm von Diez and Wilhelm Leibl. It was there that he developed a dark, realistic style of painting characterized by direct brushwork. Alongside fellow American painters such as William Merritt Chase and John Henry Twachtman, Duveneck challenged the traditions of the Hudson River School and ushered in a new art movement characterized by greater freedom of paint application.

Success: Duveneck's work initially received little attention in Covington but gained significant recognition when exhibited at the Boston Art Club in 1875. This led to a surge in students seeking his instruction both in Germany and Italy, where he frequently visited. At the age of 27, he was already a celebrated artist. In 1878, Duveneck established a school in Munich and later in the village of Polling, Bavaria. His students, known as the "Duveneck Boys," included notable artists such as John Twachtman, Otto Henry Bacher, Julius Rolshoven, and John White Alexander.

Following the death of his wife in 1888, Duveneck returned to the United States from Italy. He briefly focused on sculpture and created a beautiful monument in Florence dedicated to his late wife. However, her passing marked a decline in his productivity, and despite his wealth, he chose a relatively obscure life. He lived in Covington until his death in 1919, teaching at the Art Academy of Cincinnati. Some of his notable students included Cornelia Cassady Davis, Ida Holterhoff Holloway, John Christen Johansen, M. Jean McLane, Edward Charles Volkert, Russel Wright, Charles Mills, Frances Farrand Dodge, and Herman and Bessie Wessel.

Legacy: Duveneck's notable paintings include "Lady with Fan" (1873) and "The Whistling Boy" (1872), which demonstrate his debt to the dark palette and dynamic brushwork of Frans Hals. His works can be found in prestigious institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Cincinnati Art Museum, and more. He was elected as an associate member of the National Academy of Design in 1905 and became a full academician in 1906. Duveneck received numerous accolades, including a special gold medal at the San Francisco Exposition in 1915. In the same year, he donated a substantial collection of his own works to the Cincinnati Museum.

Personal Life: In 1886, Duveneck married one of his students, Elizabeth Boott, who was admired by writer Henry James. They had a son named Frank Boott Duveneck. Elizabeth tragically died of pneumonia in Paris, which deeply affected Duveneck. Later in life, he often spent summers in Gloucester, Massachusetts, where he visited his son

After Frank Duveneck's death on January 3, 1919, in Cincinnati, Ohio, he was laid to rest at the Mother of God Cemetery in Covington. To commemorate his legacy, a life-sized bronze statue depicting Duveneck holding a plaque with his wife's picture was erected in a small park at the intersection of Pike and Washington Streets in Covington.

Frank Duveneck left behind a lasting impact on the art world. His bold brushwork, dark palette, and direct style of painting influenced many artists of his time. He played a significant role in breaking away from the traditional conventions of the Hudson River School and paving the way for a new artistic movement.

Today, Duveneck's artworks can be found in renowned museums and collections across the United States, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Richmond Art Museum, and the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center in Poughkeepsie, New York. His contributions to the art world were recognized when he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an associate member in 1905, later becoming a full academician in 1906.

Frank Duveneck's personal life was marked by his marriage to Elizabeth Boott, one of his students. Their union was admired by the renowned writer Henry James. They lived together in Villa Castellani in Florence, Italy, where Elizabeth had been raised, for two years. Tragically, Elizabeth passed away from pneumonia in Paris, leaving Duveneck devastated. In his later years, he frequently visited his son in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and continued painting en plein air.

Frank Duveneck's artistic legacy, marked by his distinctive style and influential teaching, solidified his position as a celebrated figure in American art history. His contributions to the art world continue to inspire and captivate audiences to this day.

 

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